Archive for the ‘Blogroll’ Category

What Ferguson could have learned from Nelson Mandela

Tuesday, August 26th, 2014
What Ferguson could learn from Nelson Mandela.

What Ferguson could learn from Nelson Mandela.


“…blood is crying from the ground, crying for vengeance, crying for justice.”

 

This is the call by Pastor Charles Ewing, an uncle of Michael Brown, a black man who was killed by a white policeman in Ferguson, Missouri.

 

Like many activists and speakers connected to the protests, church services and even the eulogy for Michael Brown, the calls to action have been for vengeance and to make Michael Brown a martyr – a trigger for potentially more race riots and cries of racial injustice.

 

“No peace. Do not talk about peace. Give us weapons.”

 

This is the call by a mother who lost her child.

 

But it is not the call of Michael Brown’s mother.

 

It was the call during Apartheid in South Africa made to Nelson Mandela soon after his release from 27 years in prison.

 

There, the black people had suffered extraordinary injustices at the hands of the white ruling government.

 

Like Al Sharpton or any other activists who claim leadership over the black community, Nelson Mandela who was their true recognized leader, had to respond.

 

“There is only one way forward and that is peace.

I know that is not what you want to hear, but there is no other way.

I am your leader. I am going to tell you always when you are wrong. And I tell you now, you are wrong!

…I have lost 27 years in prison…I have forgiven them.”

 

Nelson Mandela didn’t puff up his chest or call for more anger.

 

He turned away from his own wife, Winnie Mandela who remained angry and continued to promote and fuel more anger and violence against the whites and each other. Winnie Mandela endorsed “necklacing” – burning people alive using tires and gasoline: “With our boxes of matches and our necklaces we shall liberate this country.”

 

The blacks were killing the blacks – even burning them alive.

Continue reading “What Ferguson could have learned from Nelson Mandela” »

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Gene Simmons says to depressed people “F..k you, kill yourself”

Friday, August 15th, 2014
Gene Simmons: Depressed people, alcoholics and drug addicts should kill themselves

Gene Simmons: Depressed people, alcoholics and drug addicts should kill themselves

Robin Williams tragically took his own life on Monday August 11, 2014, and statistics now reveal that for the first time  in the US, suicide is the leading cause of death by injury surpassing car accident deaths,

 

So why would a rock icon suggest that people who are depressed should kill themselves and that alcoholics and drug addicts “sees themselves as a victim”?

 

Here’s what Gene Simmons of KISS told Roger Carlin of Songfacts.com just a few days before Robin Williams (who admitted he was an alcoholic) killed himself:

 

“No, I don’t get along with anybody who’s a drug addict and has a dark cloud over their head and sees themselves as a victim. Drug addicts and alcoholics are always: “The world is a harsh place.” My mother was in a concentration camp in Nazi Germany. I don’t want to hear fuck all about “the world as a harsh place.” She gets up every day, smells the roses and loves life. And for a putz, 20-year-old kid to say, “I’m depressed, I live in Seattle.” Fuck you, then kill yourself.

I never understand, because I always call them on their bluff. I’m the guy who says ‘Jump!’ when there’s a guy on top of a building who says, “That’s it, I can’t take it anymore, I’m going to jump.”

Are you kidding? Why are you announcing it? Shut the fuck up, have some dignity and jump! You’ve got the crowd.”

Should people who are victims of violence, living in Israel and Gaza and whom are depressed also kill themselves? Should returning US servicemen suffering from PTSD and depression also kill themselves? Should a woman who was raped and is now depressed and suiicidal go ahead and kill herself? Should all alcoholics and drug addicts everywhere kill themselves?

 

What would Gene Simmons say to parents of children who have committed suicide because of depression?

 

What would Gene Simmons say if he were to learn that Robin Williams had read Simmons’ comments days before taking his own life?

 

In response to Gene Simmons words, Triple M radio network in Australia has banned and removed all KISS songs from their playlist nationwide and appealed to other radio stations in Australia and the US to do the same and ban Kiss’ songs.

 

“Depression and suicide are not topics he should be using to further his notoriety or sell records. His desperation to use mental health issues to find relevancy in a modern age is sickening.”
-       Mike Fitzpatrick, Group Content Director Triple M Network, Australia. Mike Fitzpatrick also called Gene Simmons a “dickhead”  

Mötley Crüe bassist Nikki Sixx slammed Simmons on his radio show, Sixx Sense:

 

“It’s pretty moronic because [Simmons] thinks everybody listens to him, that he is the God of Thunder. He will tell you he is the greatest man on earth, and to be honest with you, I like Gene. But in this situation, I don’t like Gene. I don’t like Gene’s words…There is a 20-year-old kid out there who is a Kiss fan and reads this and goes, ‘You know what? He’s right. I should just kill myself.’For people who are depressed, there is a way out. There are many, many ways out. And I don’t want people to listen to an interview from a rock star, who’s telling you the only way out is out.”

Australia, similar to the USA, has a tragically high suicide rate, with suicide killing three times more Australian males aged between 15 and 45 than all car accidents combined. What would Gene Simmons say to the families and loved ones of these people who committed suicide?

 

IN AUSTRALIA: If you are concerned about your own emotional wellbeing, are experiencing a personal crisis or are concerned about someone else, contact Beyond Blue at www.beyondblue.org.au or 1300 22 4636

 

IN THE US: Call National Suicide Prevention line – 1-800-273-8255

 

 

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (2 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: +1 (from 1 vote)
[Slashdot] [Digg] [Reddit] [del.icio.us] [Facebook] [Technorati] [Google] [StumbleUpon]

Prejudice & racism have no color or political lines

Thursday, July 31st, 2014
Racism prejudice have no color or poltiical lines

Justin Bieber, Mark Cuban, Cliven Bundy, Donald Sterling and V.Stiviano. What do they all have in common?

The Puyallup Tribe which owns Emerald Queen Casino in Tacoma cancels two of rocker Ted Nugent’s shows because of racist remarks such as calling President Obama “subhuman mongrel.”

 

Rancher Cliven Bundy says African Americans were “better off as slaves, picking cotton and having a family life.” 

 

A video catches a 15-year old Justin Bieber making a racist joke; another video exposes the woman who recorded Donald Sterling’s racist remarks, V. Stiviano making racist jokes herself – but about African Americans.

 

African history reveals that the warring black tribes of Wolofs and Mandinkas sold off their captives to the European slave traders.

 

And so it seems prejudice, bias and racism have no color!

 

In fact, the owner of the Dallas Mavericks, Mark Cuban said the same thing when he spoke of his own prejudices – fear of the black man in the hoodie and the white bald man with tattoos. Cuban was referring to class distinction, personal safety and stereotypes.

 

British actor Gary Oldman says we are all hypocrites because we have all said racist things:
“I don’t know about Mel [Gibson.] He got drunk and said a few things, but we’ve all said those things. We’re all fucking hypocrites. That’s what I think about it. The policeman who arrested him has never used the word n—– or that fucking Jew? I’m being brutally honest here. It’s the hypocrisy of it that drives me crazy.”

Continue reading “Prejudice & racism have no color or political lines” »

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Celebrity issues No. 20 – Real issues – childhood & pre-fame issues

Monday, June 23rd, 2014
Celebrity issues No. 20 - Real issues – childhood & pre-fame issues

“Marriage brought up all the kind of things I pushed to the back-burner – the fear, the mistrust, the doubts, and the insecurities.” – Jennifer Aniston

Here is the final issue, No. 20 of the Top 20 issues of being a celebrity. For the previous article, for issues No. 18 and 19 click here.

 

20. “My real issue…” – Uncovering the core issues prior to becoming a celebrity

Every one of us has issues that were created during our childhood; something our parents (caretakers) did or didn’t do; something that resulted in painful emotions that we haven’t yet released along with disempowering subconscious beliefs that affect the way we view and interact with the people and world around us.

 

Just because you are famous and a celebrity doesn’t mean that those emotions and beliefs have magically disappeared or will magically disappear.

 

In other words, aside of the challenges that are the result of being famous (as explained above), like everybody else, your unique experiences and upbringing have combined to make you who you are and have created your perspectives. Of course, with the right help, they can be changed!

 

 

“He made me terrified all the time, terrified like I had to pee on myself. I remember one night he made her nose bleed. I was crying and thinking, ‘I’m just gonna go crazy on him one day.’ … I hate him to this day.”
Continue reading “Celebrity issues No. 20 – Real issues – childhood & pre-fame issues” »

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Celebrity issues No. 18, 19 – Cognitive dissonance and no one understands me

Tuesday, June 17th, 2014
Celebrity issues 18, 19  Cognitive dissonance and no one understands me

“Celebrity took a while for me to understand. I had to mature. I had to understand that being a celebrity was my new reality, I couldn’t avoid it” – Paul Michael Glaser (right) – Starsky & Hutch

Here are issues No. 18 & 19 of the Top 20 issues of being a celebrity. For the previous article, for issue No. 17, click here.

 

 

18. “I am so conflicted” – Cognitive Dissonance

Given the complexities of the life and phenomenon of a being celebrity, it is not surprising or unusual that every celebrity will experience extraordinary mental and emotional conflicts if not Cognitive Dissonance.

 

Cognitive Dissonance is the mental and emotional stress that is created when there are two contradictory thoughts, both of which you accept to be true.

 

Here are just a few of the contradictory thoughts:

 

  • I love fame/I hate fame
  • I am great/I am an impostor
  • My fans love me/Everyone uses me
  • I can do whatever I want/I am a product and everyone owns me
  • I have no privacy/I am all alone
  • I want everyone to see me & know me/I want to be left alone
  • Fame is equivalent to worthiness/fame is meaningless

 

Continue reading “Celebrity issues No. 18, 19 – Cognitive dissonance and no one understands me” »

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Celebrity issues No. 17 – Fraud and the impostor syndrome

Wednesday, June 11th, 2014
Celebrity issues No. 17 – Fraud and the impostor syndrome

“The questions I was running from were: ‘Is this success all a fluke? Had I been fooling everybody so far? Will I get caught?’” – Charlie Sheen

Here is issue No. 17 of the Top 20 issues of being a celebrity. For the previous article, for issue No. 16, click here.

 

 

17. “I am a fraud. They’re going to find out the truth about me” – Impostor Syndrome

This is the one issue that is common to everybody!

 

Everybody!

 

It doesn’t matter who you are, how famous, powerful, rich, successful, intelligent, educated or beautiful you might be; we all subconsciously doubt ourselves and question our value, believing that we are not good enough – we are impostors!

 

“I’d begun drinking all the time. We shot in New York City, so I’d be out to the bars every night till 3 or 4 a.m., then try to show up for a 6 o’clock call to stand toe to toe with Michael Douglas and handle 50% of a scene…The questions I was running from were: ‘Is this success all a fluke? Had I been fooling everybody so far? Will I get caught?’ It was easy to get hammered and messed up. But in doing so, I buried my self-respect, I buried my self-esteem, I buried my creative drive, and I damned near buried myself.”
-       Charlie Sheen, 1987, talking about the filming of “Wall St” and his challenges believing in himself and his value.  http://patrickwanis.com/blog/are-you-an-impostor/

 

  Continue reading “Celebrity issues No. 17 – Fraud and the impostor syndrome” »

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Celebrity issues No. 16 – Lack of responsibility & accountability, destruction of core values

Sunday, June 1st, 2014
Celebrity issues No. 16 - Lack of responsibility & accountability, destruction of core values

“The issue involved here was my repeated irresponsible behavior. I was unfaithful. I had affairs. I cheated.” – Tiger Woods

Here is issue No. 16 of the Top 20 issues of celebrities. For the previous article, for issue No. 15, click here.

 

 

16. “Everyone else will take care of it” – Lack of responsibility & accountability, and destruction of core values

It is true: when you are a celebrity, everyone around you will ‘take care of it’; they will take care of the problems – as long as it still benefits and profits them to do so.

 

When you say or do the wrong thing, the publicists, attorneys and managers will all move into place and do what they need to do to get you off the charges, appease the media & public and protect the brand. They will make contributions to the right charity; they will speak to the right judges; they will make the offer that others won’t refuse, and they will draft your statements – all with the sole intention to rid you of your ‘sins’ and ensure that you are still loved by the public and Hollywood i.e. so you won’t lose your massive sponsorship deals or be tossed out of the Riviera Country Club which cost you $300,000 membership.

Continue reading “Celebrity issues No. 16 – Lack of responsibility & accountability, destruction of core values” »

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Celebrity issues No. 15 – Fame, destruction of family and relationships

Saturday, May 24th, 2014

Celebrity issues 15 Fame, destruction of family and relationships

“[We] were engulfed and then swept away by a wave of fame and fortune. It got rather too much for me to cope with.” – Jane Hawking, first wife, who divorced Stephen Hawking in 1990

Here is issue No. 15 of the Top 20 issues of celebrities. For the previous article, for issue No. 14, click here.

 

15. “Fame has destroyed my family/marriage” – Fame’s impact on relationships

Many people dream about being born into wealth and fame; some women even pursue the rich and famous man as a potential husband.

 

The belief is that by marrying into or being a part of the celebrity’s family, a new world will open – a world of glamour, parties, wealth and an endless life of luxurious vacations, palatial homes, servants and the very best of everything.

 

But the celebrity knows that this turns out to be a myth. There is even less time and attention for the people in the family of someone truly rich and famous,

 

The exposure to fame has a negative impact on the family and relationships.

 

Family members claim they feel invisible, secondary, ignored or robbed of the relationship; robbed of the person they love and cherish.

Continue reading “Celebrity issues No. 15 – Fame, destruction of family and relationships” »

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Celebrity issues No. 14 – Denial & delusions of grandeur

Sunday, May 18th, 2014

Celebrity issues 14 Denial & delusions of grandeur

“[He]…is the Chosen One. He’ll have the power to impact nations.”
Tiger Woods’ father, Earl

Here is issue No. 14 of the Top 20 issues of celebrities. Click here for the previous article, for issue No. 13.

 

 

14. “I am invincible & almighty” – Denial and delusions of grandeur

By now it is clear that the people around you are going to build you up – your fans, audience and those with vested interests in you i.e. parasites, enablers, entourage and handlers. They will constantly mold and edify your ego; they will give you hypnotic suggestions reinforcing your power, greatness, significance, value and godlike status.

 

 

What is the result?

 

Delusions of grandeur, and denial about your reality.

 

 

“I really do believe he was put here for a bigger reason than just to play golf. I don’t think that he is a god, but I do believe that he was sent by one.”
-      Michael Jordan discussing Tiger Woods

 

 

“[He]…is the Chosen One. He’ll have the power to impact nations.”
-       Tiger Woods’ father, Earl, in 1996 predicting his son’s rise to the heavens, saying he will be bigger than Ghandi or Buddha

 

 

Some of the forms of delusions of grandeur have already been noted above – lack of boundaries, ‘the law doesn’t apply to me’, ‘It’s all about me’, ‘Don’t you know who I am’, ‘I am entitled’ and so forth. However, the other aspect of delusions of grandeur is the belief that money will continue to pour in forever, and abundance will never end.

Continue reading “Celebrity issues No. 14 – Denial & delusions of grandeur” »

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Celebrity issues No. 13 – Narcissism and the Fame Factor

Monday, May 12th, 2014
Celebrity issues No. 13 - Narcissism and the Fame Factor

“My greatest pain in life is that I will never be able to see myself perform live” – Kanye West

Here is issue No. 13 of the Top 20 issues of being a celebrity. Click here for the previous article, for celebrity issues 11 & 12.

 

 

13. “It’s all about me” – Narcissism – The Fame Factor

Narcissism is a disorder which is identified by lack of empathy, grandiose fantasies, promiscuity, inability to form meaningful relationships, excessive need for approval, extreme response to criticism (usually anger), rage, exaggerated self-absorption, social isolation and depression,

 

Narcissism usually occurs as a result of childhood upbringing, lack of attention, abandonment, neglect and so forth. Narcissism often reflects deep deficits in self-esteem which causes the extreme drive for over-compensation. Narcissism can also occur when a child was never taught boundaries and where the parents gave into every desire and whim of the child making him/her the center of the universe and oblivious to the existence and needs of others. This often occurs with children who had no siblings and were made the center of the universe for their entire childhood.

Continue reading “Celebrity issues No. 13 – Narcissism and the Fame Factor” »

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 5.0/5 (1 vote cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)